EVENTS



October 12, 2016, 5:30 

Forensic DNA Phenotyping

In this installment of the Forensic Science Lecture Series, explore the emerging science of appearance prediction with Dr. Susan Walsh (IUPUI).

Advance registration requested (click here)



October 23, 2016, 2:00-4:00

Wizards Academy: Mystery Edition

Visit with fantastic creatures from Animalia, Inc, explore the magic of science, and solve a mystery by performing hands-on experiments! For children grades 3-6.

**Participants are encouraged to dress up in their favorite wizardly attire!**
No brooms, wings or other protruding accessories, please.

Advance registration required (click here)



This series spotlights the patient perspective on life at Indiana's flagship mental institution, Central State Hospital (1848-1994).




August 26 and 27, 2016

7:00 both evenings 

$5 | Free for students | Registration required (click here)

Then There Is No Need to Speak

A one-woman theatrical performance. Based on the 1886 memoir From Under the Cloud by Anna Agnew, a former patient at the Indiana Hospital for the Insane. 

Read the memoir here

The 60-minute performance will be followed by a short historical presentation and a talk-back session.

***Doors open at 6:30. Please plan arrive at least 15 minutes early to get seated before the performance begins.***

Written by Thomas Hummel

Directed by Terri Bourus

Starring Denise Jaeckel

Historical commentary provided by Kathleen Brian





September 26 and 27, 2016

6:00 both evenings

Free | Registration required (click here)

I Remember Jones: A Conversation with Nanny Vonnegut

The artist Nanny Vonnegut, daughter of the acclaimed author Kurt Vonnegut, will read her maternal grandmother Riah Cox’s brief memoir, “I Remember Jones,” written about Cox's hospitalization at Central State in the 1940s.

Along with IUPUI professor of English Jane Schultz, Vonnegut will discuss her family, the history of mental health care, and the healing power of the arts. Vonnegut will be sharing some her own artwork (see image above, from her painting "Family Tree"), as well as family photographs.

 ***Doors open at 5:30. Please plan arrive at least 15 minutes early to get seated.***

Left: Nanette Vonnegut, "Family Tree"



October 6, 2016

5:30 pm | At Central State Mansion 

Free | Advance registration requested (click here)

Central State Hospital - Historical Marker Dedication

Gather at 202 Steeples Blvd and see the unveiling of a new Indiana State Historical Marker commemorating Central State Hospital, Indiana’s flagship mental institution (1848-1994). A short reception will follow the dedication ceremony.



November 10, 2016

6:00 panel discussion | 7:oo exhibit opening

Free | Registration Required (coming soon)

Leaving Home

An exhibit opening and panel discussion on the 1994 closure of Central State. The exhibit, based on patient-produced newsletters, will be on display at the Indiana Medical History Museum from November 10, 2016-March 2017.

Left: Photo courtesy of The Indianapolis Star

"Voices from Central State" is the product of a partnership between the Indiana Medical History Museum and the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program at IUPUI. Assistance with the theatrical production of "Then There Is No Need to Speak" provided by Discover Near West Indys. Funding support provided by IU's New Frontiers ProgramIndiana Humanities, The Arts Council of Indianapolis, and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

PAST EVENTS


Saturday, August 20, 2016 7:00 pm

Nerve and Knowledge: Two Lectures on Doctors, Medicine, and Sherlock Holmes

Presented by: The Illustrious Clients of Indianapolis, The Baker Street Irregulars, and The Indiana Medical History Museum

Arthur Conan Doyle, who began his career as a physician and only later turned exclusively to writing, modeled the Great Detective after Dr. Joseph Bell, a famous diagnostician and teacher of Conan Doyle. And of course, the stories are narrated by Dr. John Watson, an invalided army surgeon and general practitioner. With this in mind, earlier this year, The Baker Street Irregulars published the new book Nerve and Knowledge: Doctors, Medicine, and the Sherlockian Canon.

Join us as Andre L. Solberg, MHS, ASH, BSI and Marilynne McKay, MD, ASH discuss the medical issues and motifs that heavily influence the adventures of Sherlock Holmes in the historic amphitheater of the Old Pathology Building (1896) of Central State Hospital that now houses the Indiana Medical History Museum.

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Sunday, July 24, 2:00 pm

The Pless Memorial Central State Lecture

On the Set of “Mercy Street”: Retrieving the 19th Century in the 21st

 By Jane Schultz, PhD, Department of English, IUPUI

Jane Schultz, PhD, consultant and script advisor for the PBS Civil War drama “Mercy Street,” will speak about the writers’ and directors’ attempts to represent the lives of 19th-century health care workers and their soldier-patients to 21st-century viewers.

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Tuesday, July 12, 6:00-7:30pm

Book Discussion

"IN Writing: Uncovering the Unexpected Hoosier State" By Douglas A. Wissing

Partnering up with the Indianapolis Public Library, the Indiana Medical History Museum will host an author-led book discussion of IN Writing: Uncovering the Unexpected Hoosier State.

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Saturday, July 9, 4:00-8:00 pm

Open House at Flow Fest

As part of the Flow Fest occurring on the grounds of the former Central State Hospital, the Indiana Medical History Museum is hosting an open house! Explore medical history and local lore at the “Old Pathology Building,” once the center of research at Indiana’s Central State psychiatric hospital. 

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Wednesday, May 18, 5:30 pm

Forensic Entomology: From Sung Tzu’s Observations to Today’s Genomic Revolution

By Christine J. Picard, PhD, Department of Biology, IUPUI

Forensic entomology uses living organisms to tell us about the process of decomposition. From the early days of observing the close association of decomposition and insects, to today, where we look  into the genomes of these insects to learn about their behaviors and variabilities, this presentation will examine how far we’ve come – and where we are heading – in time of death estimations.

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Sunday, December 6, 2015 2:00 pm

Annual Meeting of the Membership and Glenn B. Mather, MD Memorial Lecture

Lecture by Dr. Stephen Nawrocki, University of Indianapolis

Fighting the Deadliest Killer: The National Tuberculosis Association's Christmas Seal Campaign, 1907-1968

Tuberculosis, or "consumption", was humanity's number one killer through history. During the first half of the 20th century, a massive public health campaign was conducted by the National Tuberculosis Association, whose cornerstone fundraising mechanism was the annual Christmas Seal campaign. This presentation examines how the NTA used seals and associated propaganda to combat TB both nationally and in Indiana.

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Thursday, November 12, 2015 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM and

Friday , November 13, 2015 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

A Matter of Life and Death: Neuroscience on the Silver Screen

A Spirit & Place Festival Event

Presented by the IMHM and the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, Central Indiana Chapter

Roger Ebert called A Matter of Life and Death (1946) “one of the most audacious films ever made.” Like the 1990 film Awakenings, it approaches what could be a bleak subject—neurological illness—and explores the vast expanses contained within the human heart and mind. The film depicts British Air Force pilot Peter Carter (David Niven) after a near death experience in which on-going hallucinations (waking dreams) convince him he was not meant to survive. 

After the screening (104 min), two members of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, Diane Friedman and Kathy Hubner, will lead a short discussion. Friedman, author of A Matter of Life and Death: The Brain Revealed by the Mind of Michael Powell (2008), will highlight how the filmmakers made use of neuroscience medicine and Hubner, winner of the 2015 National Award for Excellence in Advanced Practice Neuroscience Nursing, will share stories of patients who have transcended seemingly insurmountable barriers. 

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Sunday, October 25, 2015 2:00-4:00 pm

11th Annual Wizards Academy

Visit with fantastic creatures from Animalia, Inc. and explore the magic of   science through hands-on experiments! This year, children and adults can attend the academy side-by-side.Participants are encouraged to dress up in their favorite wizardly attire! 

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015 4:00-5:15 pm

CSI Indianapolis: The True Investigation

Fall Forensics Lecture 2015

Erica Christensen, MS

"As a Crime Scene Specialist for Marion County, I aid law enforcement in the collection and processing of evidence for serious crimes in the Indianapolis area. My presentation will cover the education, experience, and skills necessary to perform crime scene investigations, as compared to how the job is presented in the popular media."

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Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 4:30-6:30 pm                                                                                                                                                             More than the Happy Little Hamsters: Seventy Years of Sex Education Films in Indiana

Angela Potter, Doctoral Candidate in History, Purdue University

A second presentation.

Did you ever wonder what the boys were watching in the gym while the girls watched The Story of Menstruation? Angela Potter will present the history of sex education in Indiana since World War II through a series of film clips including the 1960 Happy Little Hamsters, accused of being "pornographic" in a 1969 lawsuit,  to more recent films used by the Social Health Association of Indiana in its sex education classes.  This event marks the opening of a special exhibit "Seventy Years of Leading the Way for Kids: The History of The Social Health Association of Indiana."

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Saturday September 26, 2015, 9:00-10:00 am                                                                                                                                                                                                         Seeking Asylum: Preservation at Central State

Indiana Landmarks presents

On September 26, Indiana Landmarks stages Seeking Asylum: Preservation at Central State, a behind-the-scenes tour of the historic campus.

Visitors on the two-hour walking tour will see three of the landmarks that remain. At the 1896 Old Pathology Building, home of the Indiana Medical History Museum—an entry on Indiana Landmarks’ Ten Most Endangered list this year—participants will see the one-of-a-kind collections and learn about the preservation challenges it faces.

Tours also guide you through two repurposed buildings: the 1938 Administration Building, renamed Central State Mansion that currently houses IUPUI students, and the turn-of-the-century dining hall that has reopened as 1899, an events venue. The walking tour will pass by two derelict structures with potential—the 1886 power house and the laundry—that need imaginative new uses.

Tours leave every fifteen minutes from 9 to 10 a.m., departing from Indiana Medical History Museum, 3045 West Vermont Street in Indianapolis.

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Thursday, September 17, 7:30 pm                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

Presented by Indy Film Fest's Roving Cinema

When Randle Patrick McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) gets transferred for evaluation from a prison farm to a mental institution, he assumes it will be a less restrictive environment. But the martinet Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) runs the psychiatric ward with an iron fist, keeping her patients cowed through abuse, medication and sessions of electroconvulsive therapy. The battle of wills between the rebellious McMurphy and the inflexible Ratched soon affects all the ward's patients.

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Thursday, August 6, 2015, 4:30-6:30 pm                                                                                                                                                                     More than the Happy Little Hamsters: Seventy Years of Sex Education Films in Indiana

Angela Potter, Doctoral Candidate in History, Purdue University

Did you ever wonder what the boys were watching in the gym while the girls watched The Story of Menstruation? Angela Potter will present the history of sex education in Indiana since World War II through a series of film clips including the 1960 Happy Little Hamsters, accused of being "pornographic" in a 1969 lawsuit,  to more recent films used by the Social Health Association of Indiana in its sex education classes.  This event marks the opening of a special exhibit "Seventy Years of Leading the Way for Kids: The History of Thee Social Health Association of Indiana."


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Wednesday, July 15, 2015, 6:00-7:15 pm

Ahdy Helmy, MD, IU School of Medicine

"I am illustrating the ancient Egyptian belief in eternity and afterlife. The belief in an afterlife with the same body triggered an intense desire to preserve it, hence the mummification art and the desire to keep the body healthy and intact. This led to a whole prospect of abilities to recognize and diagnose diseases, and to work hard at implementing remedies and surgical procedures. The Egyptians’ belief in justice and in good deeds upon which their destination in the afterlife is determined created an atmosphere of civility within Egypt as a nation, an atmosphere that allowed creativity, excellence in invention, and medicine as an art to progress.” 

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Saturday, May 30, 2015, 2:15-2:45 pm                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        “Pull, Probe, Shock, Buzz! Rarely Seen Artifacts at the Indiana Medical History Museum”

A special Obscura Day presentation that will include a “Magneto-Electric-Spring-Machine” (for pulling teeth), an “Uterector,” an early—and particularly torturous—sort of IUD; an electrostatic voltmeter with a cryptic nickname, “The Influencing Machine”; as well as a variety vibrating devices.

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Wednesday May 20, 6:00-7:15 pm

Cracking the Case: Interpreting Skeletal Trauma and Fracture Patterns in Bone 

Dr. Stephen Nawrocki, Archaeology and Forensics Laboratory, University of Indianapolis

Spring Forensics Lecture 2015 : A Second Presentation

Forensic anthropologists are frequently asked to analyze human remains to assist the pathologist and coroner in their determination of the cause of death of a decedent. However, wounds and fractures to the bones can be difficult to interpret, particularly when the remains have been exposed to weathering, animal scavenging, and farming machinery. This presentation will examine how the anthropologist uses scraps of bone to reconstruct the events that occurred at the time of death, drawing on an understanding of basic fracture mechanics and no small measure of pure luck to identify and distinguish blunt, sharp, and gunshot trauma.

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Thursday, May 14, 6:00 pm
Read Indy Competition

The Indiana Medical History Museum competed against four other finalists in the
5x5 Read Indy Competition put on by Indiana Humanities and Indy Reads at the Fountain Square Theatre. 

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Wednesday May 13, 4:00-5:15 pm
Cracking the Case: Interpreting Skeletal Trauma and Fracture Patterns in Bone 

Spring Forensics Lecture 2015

Dr. Stephen Nawrocki, Archaeology and Forensics Laboratory, University of Indianapolis

Forensic anthropologists are frequently asked to analyze human remains to assist the pathologist and coroner in their determination of the cause of death of a decedent. However, wounds and fractures to the bones can be difficult to interpret, particularly when the remains have been exposed to weathering, animal scavenging, and farming machinery. This presentation will examine how the anthropologist uses scraps of bone to reconstruct the events that occurred at the time of death, drawing on an understanding of basic fracture mechanics and no small measure of pure luck to identify and distinguish blunt, sharp, and gunshot trauma.

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Sunday, December 7, 2014
By Clay W. Stuckey, DDS

IMHM Annual Meeting of the Membership and Glenn B. Mather, MD Memorial Lecture
 
The Trials and Tribulations of the Corpse of Abraham Lincoln: How nefarious tomb robbers and incompetant tomb builders did not allow him to rest in peace.  A brief business meeting will be followed by the lecture and light refreshments.  $5 suggested donation.


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Discover the work of wandering artist John Zwara (1880-1951), whose schizophrenia diagnosis landed him at the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane in 1938.

1:00-1:45 pm, Amphitheater
Former fine arts curator at the Indiana State Museum and a leading authority on John Zwara, Rachel Perry will acquaint visitors with the artist’s life and work.

2:15-3:00 pm, Amphitheater
Professor of art therapy at Herron School of Art and Design and a practicing clinician, Juliet King will place Zwara’s story in the context of the development of art therapy throughout the twentieth century until today.

Between presentations and after, visitors can view the Indiana Medical History Museum’s John Zwara Collection in the upstairs exhibit hall.
     
This event is presented by the Indiana Medical History Museum and the IUPUI Herron School of Art and Design - Art Therapy Program

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October 26, 2014, 2:00 - 4:30 pm

Visit with magical creatures from Animalia, Inc. and explore the science behind your favorite wizard’s magical world through hands-on experiments!

Monica Medina, Interim Director of the Center for Multicultural Education at IUPUI, will educate and entertain parents while their young wizards attend classes.

Recommended for grades 3-6. Children $8; Adults $6. Family Packages are available.
 
Advance registration is required. Participants are encouraged to dress up in their favorite wizardly attire.  

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 4:00 pm
Abraham Lincoln: Forensics of an Assassination

Forensic Lecture Series | Fall 2014


What if modern forensic investigation techniques were applied to the Abraham Lincoln assassination? What can we learn from the firearm that was recovered from Ford’s Theater? From what distance did the shooting occur? And why did so many at the theater report not hearing the fatal shot?

Based on research conducted with a Derringer pistol and a “Spatter Head” that simulates the structure of the human cranium, Douglas H. Boxler, Firearms Investigator for the Indianapolis Marion County Forensic Services Agency, will provide some possible answers.


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Saturday, September 20, 2014 9:45 am- 10:45 am

Garden Kids! 

Kids will learn all about plants through hands-on activities! They will:
· Identify garden plants
· See how plants grow
· Explore how plants can be used as medicine


Recommended for ages 6-9. Accompanying parents will be treated to a talk in the museum amphitheater by Kathy Hull, Master Gardener and MD, "Growing Miracles: Modern Wonder Drugs from the Medicinal Garden." 


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Wednesday, April 2, 2014 4:00 to 5:15 pm

"A Cemetery without Crosses: Migrant Death and Forensic Investigations along the South Texas Border"


By Dr. Krista Latham, Jessica Campbell, Erica Christensen, Justin Maiers and Ryan Strand

Spring Installment of the Forensic Science Lecture Series

This presentation will highlight the human rights work that faculty and students from the University of Indianapolis have been conducting along the south Texas border.  They spent several weeks in the summer of 2013 exhuming the bodies of unidentified migrants that were buried in pauper's graves without a forensic investigation into their identity.  Thirteen sets of skeletal remains were eventually transported to the University of Indianapolis Archaeology and Forensic Laboratory for forensic analysis in an attempt to contribute to the positive identification process.  The team will introduce the audience to the humanitarian crisis on the border and discuss their work by following one of these unidentified individuals from exhumation at the cemetery to forensic analysis in the laboratory.

The Forensic Science Lecture Series (FSLS), sponsored jointly by the Indiana Medical History Museum and the University of Indianapolis Archaeology & Forensics Laboratory, was established in 2004 to help educate the public in the forensic sciences and related fields as well as to spotlight the fascinating stories that scientists have to tell.        

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Thursday, November 7, 2013 6-8 pm

Scientific Heroism: Risk in Biological Research for the Benefit of Public Health


This is a Spirit and Place Festival event.  The program is free and open to the public. 

 

Embracing the 2013 Spirit and Place Festival theme RISK, our panelists, Nordschow Professor Emeritus Dr. James Smith and Senior Research Professor Dr. George Sandusky, both from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at IU School of Medicine, and Norma B. Erickson, Assistant Technical Director at AIT Laboratories in Indianapolis and graduate student in History at IUPUI, will discuss the general history of risk in medical research and the overall risks of laboratory work.  They'll describe specific cases of accidental exposure and laboratory-acquired infections over the last 150 years, including recent cases.  They will also talk about specific risks, and steps taken to diminish those risks, in research on the malarial treatment of syphilis that was conducted in the laboratories of the Old Pathology Department of Central State Hospital, which now houses the Indiana Medical History Museum.

 

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Sunday, October, 27, 2013 2-4:30 pm

9th Annual Wizards Academy

 

Visit with wondrous creatures from Animalia, Inc. and explore the science behind your favorite boy wizard's magical world through hands-on experiments! A special guest speaker will educate and entertain parents while their young wizards attend classes.


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Wednesday, October 9, 2013  4-5:15pm

Tiny but not trivial...Microscopy in Forensic Science


Fall 2013 Installment of the Forensic Science Lecture Series

This lecture is free and open to the public.


Gina Londino, MS from the IUPUI Department of Chemistry and Clinical Biology, and Dirk Shaw, trace chemist at the Indianapolis-Marion County Forensic Services Agency, will discuss some history of microscopy in the forensic sciences, how it has been used recently in particular cases, and how the work of each differs from the other's based on many factors, including scope, resources, and purpose.  The lecture will be accompanied by our newest exhibit, opening September 12th, Looking Through the Lens: Microscopy at the Indiana Medical History Museum.

 

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Saturdays at 11am from June through September

FREE Guided Tours of the IMHM Medicinal Plant Garden


Every Saturday morning between June and September, IMHM offers free guided tours of the Medicinal Plant Garden led by one of the Purdue Master Gardeners of Marion County who lovingly maintain it. Please note that tours begin promptly at 11am and do not include a tour of the museum.

 

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013 from 4 to 5:15pm                                                                                                                                                                                                               
That's Disgusting! Estimating Time Since Death from Human Decomposition

presented by Stephen P. Nawrocki

Investigators need to know when an individual died, and this information is best estimated from insect evidence on the body. However, when insects are not available, the anthropologist can make an imprecise estimate using the state of decomposition of the soft tissues. Recent research by the University of Indianapolis Archaeology and Forensics Laboratory has tried to improve our methods by carefully examining the relationship between decay and accumulated temperature, and results suggest that we've been doing it wrong for decades. WARNING! This topic may not be suitable for very young or sensitive learners.

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Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at 11am                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Lincoln Hospital 1909-1915: A Study of Leadership in African American Healthcare in Progressive-Era Indianapolis

presented by Norma B. Erickson, graduate student in the M.A. United State History Program at IUPUI

This program is free and open to the public.

In the early years of the twentieth century, the African American community in Indianapolis faced segregation in most aspects of their lives. For black physicians, discrimination by the medical profession hampered their ability to deliver healthcare to their patients. This presentation outlines the desire of these doctors to treat their patients with quality care and the strategies they used in their attempt to create a modern hospital.

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Friday, November 16, 2012 6:30 pm                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Informed Consent and Mental Illness

Join us as Timothy T. Dick, PhD, Professor of Biology and Medical Ethics at Owensboro (KY) Community College, examines informed consent, limitations on decision-making capacity, and the role of paternalism and autonomy in mental illness.

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Tuesday, November 6, 2012 6:30-8:30 pm                                                                                    

Art & Play in Child Psychiatry     


A Spirit & Place Festival Event                                        

The field of child psychiatry has come a long way since the early 20th century when many professionals still believed that childhood mental disorders resulted from poor education and training, and many adults, including those in the medical profession, viewed children as smaller versions of adults with the same means to process emotions and receptive to the same therapeutic methods as adults. Join us as our panelists discuss art and play therapies as they are used in child psychiatry today.

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Sunday, October 28, 2012 2-4 pm                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

8th Annual Wizards Academy                                                                                

Visit with wondrous creatures from Animalia, Inc. and explore the science behind your favorite boy wizard's magical world through hands-on experiments! A special guest speaker will educate and entertain parents while their young wizards attend classes.

Cost: $8 children; $6 adults; Family Packages available. 

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 Thursday, October 25, 2012 6:30pm

 Premature Burial

 

You may have seen drawings or heard about the bells sometimes attached to coffins, just in case someone was coffined before they were really dead. Join us as Nancy L. Eckerman, History of Medicine Librarian at the Ruth Lilly Medical Library at Indiana University School of Medicine and author of Indiana in the Civil War: Doctors, Hospitals, and Medical Care, explores the origins of the once common fear of premature burial and some of the possible sociological and medical reasons for the 19th century's obsession with that possibility.


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 Wednesday, October 10, 2012 4 to 5:15pm

Designing Disaster: The Rise of the Designer Drug Movement

 

Kevin Shanks, FTS-ABFT is a toxicologist at AIT Laboratories in Indianapolis. During this program he will discuss the history of the designer drug movement from the 1960s to present, focusing on recent years regarding the synthetic cannabinoids (K2/Spice), synthetic stimulants (bath salts and plant food) and psychedelics (2C family and its derivatives.) This is the fall installment of our 2012 Forensic Science Lecture Series.

 


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 Thursday, June 21, 2012 6pm

A Bridge Between Centuries: Central State Hospital and Medical Education in Indiana to 1910


Presented by Lois Allis


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Saturdays at 11am from June through September

FREE Guided Tours of the IMHM Medicinal Plant Garden


Every Saturday morning between June and September, IMHM offers free guided tours of the Medicinal Plant Garden led by one of the Purdue Master Gardeners of Marion County who lovingly maintain it. Please note that tours begin promptly at 11am and do not include a tour of the museum.

 

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Sunday, May 20, 2012 4pm*

Growing Miracles: 5 Modern Wonder Drugs from the Medicinal Plant Garden


Kathleen Hull, MD, IMHM Board member, Indiana University Professor Emerita of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and Purdue Master Gardener, Kathleen Hull, MD, will discuss the history, botany, and basic pharmacology of five modern wonder drugs derived from plant materials including: Aspirin, from European meadowsweet; Colchicine, from Autumn crocus; Digitalis, from foxglove; Taxol and other chemotherapeutic agents, from yew and periwinkle; and Artemisinin, from Sweet Annie. Come early! The IMHM Medicinal Plant Garden will be open for viewing starting at 1pm.

 


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Thursday, April 26, 2012 6:30-8pm

Indiana- The Birthplace of Translational Research in Mental Health

Lecture & Book Signing

 

Drs. Lucy Jane King and Alan Schmetzer will discuss their new book Dr. Edenharter's Dream: How Science Improved the Humane Care of the Mentally Ill in Indiana, 1896-2012 and be on hand to sign copies (available for purchase on the day of the event for $20 each.)

 

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 Wednesday, April 18, 2012 4 to 5:15pm

Twisted: A Closer Look at Forensic DNA Analysis

 

Join us as Dr. Krista Latham, Assistant Professor of Biology and Anthropology and Director of the University of Indianapolis Molecular Anthropology Laboratory, discusses the use of DNA in medicolegal casework. Dr. Latham will introduce the audience to basic concepts in forensic DNA analysis, as well as discuss the complexities and misconceptions of interpreting the DNA information derived from crime scene samples through case examples. She will also highlight some of the research on primary DNA transfer that is currently being conducted in the University of Indianapolis Molecular Anthropology Laboratory.


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 Thursday, April 5, 2012 4:30pm

History of Contraception

Presented by Jeffrey Rothenberg, MD

 

Jeffrey Rothenberg, MD is an Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology and Vice-Chair for Faculty Development and Alumni Affairs at IU School of Medicine in Indianapolis. He will discuss the history of contraception focusing on historical milestones and culminating in what we are seeing in current events today.

 

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Saturday, December 17, 2011 10 am to 3pm                                                                                                                                                                                                              

Annual Christmas Open House

Browse the Old Pathology Building, the nation's oldest free-standing pathology laboratory, and talk with our staff and volunteers...AT NO CHARGE!

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Tuesday, November 8, 2011 6:00 to 8:30pm                                                                                                                                                                                                         

 Imaging and Imagining the Body                       

 A Spirit & Place Festival Event                                                                                                     

The Indiana Medical History Museum is partnering with the IUPUI Medical Humanities Program for this year's Spirit & Place Festival to present Imaging and Imagining the Body. 

This interactive program explores two closely related themes: the ways that medicine's view of the body has changed over time and how we need to view the body today if we are to achieve optimal health.  Radiologist and humanist Richard Gunderman, MD and PhD will introduce participants to the fascinating story of medical imaging.  Thanks to imaging technologies such as x-ray, ultrasound, and MRI, physicians can peer into the living human body without cutting it open, diagnosing disease and delivering therapy.  He will discuss how such innovations have changed the way we see the body and how they have transformed the practice of medicine.

Anthropologist Heather Wood Ion will discuss how the rest of us tend to think of the body and its diseases today and how these views sometimes undercut the level of health we achieve.  She will outline a new way of thinking about the body, one with the potential to produce an epidemic of health in our community.

Also visit the Indiana Medical History Museum's exhibit on historical perceptions of the body and death from medical, economic, and social perspectives.

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Wednesday, November 2 through Saturday, November 26, 2011                                                                                                                                                                           

Fall Food Drive          

The Indiana Medical History Museum will be collecting donations of nonperishable food items to benefit Gleaners Food Bank.  Donations can be dropped off anytime during regular business hours.

"Gleaners Food Bank's mission is to end hunger by engaging individuals and communities to provide food for people in need.  Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana, Inc. serves 21 central and southeastern Indiana counties through over 350 Hunger Relief Agencies serving the ill, needy, and hungry.  Gleaners receives donated food and critical grocery products, and in 2010, nearly 25 million pounds were distributed in our communities."  You can help by donating nonperishable food items (avoid glass containers if possible) including: canned meats like tuna and chicken, heat and serve meals such as soups and ravioli, 100% fruit juices, peanut butter and jelly, and other kid-friendly foods like macaroni, cereals, applesauce cups and healthy snacks.  Items that cannot be accepted include; home-canned goods, items without the ingredients listed on the packaging, tobacco or alcohol, and baby food that is not in the original unopened case.                             

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Wednesday, October 26, 2011   4-5:15pm                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 Reflections on Life and Death in 19th Century Indiana                                        

The fall installment of the Forensic Science Lecture Series (FSLS) is presented by Dr. John Langdon, Professor of Biology and Associate Dean in the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Indianapolis.                                                                                                                        

Cemeteries and documents permit us to reconstruct the facts of life (and death) for pioneer families and their descendants.  Franklin County, Indiana, for example, was settled by a very fertile, mobile population from the eastern states combined with a wave of German immigrants.  The result was a rural society with low population growth that enables us to observe how social modernization interacted with birth, disease, and death.

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Sunday, October 23, 2011  2-4pm                                                                                      

Wizards Academy                                                                                                     

Visit with wondrous creatures from Animalia, Inc. and explore the science behind your favorite boy wizard's magical world through hands-on experiments!  Michael Cohen, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Science and Environmental Education at IUPUI, will educate and entertain parents while their young wizards attend classes.

Cost:  $6 per child, $4 per parent

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Saturdays from June 4 through September 24, 2011  11am

Last year the Indiana Medical History Museum began offering guided tours of our annual Medicinal Plants Garden.  Our dedicated Master Gardeners work hard to grow and maintain this beautiful and educational garden and are pleased to share their knowledge of the plants and their historic medical uses to visitors.

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Thursday, July 14, 2011  6:30pm                                                                                           
                                                                                           

Joyce Miller, owner of the Huckleberry Hutch, Purdue Master Gardener, and Chairperson of the Herb Society of Central Indiana, will talk about herbal medicines used during the Civil War before many manufactured drugs were available.

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Tuesday, June 21, 2011  6:30pm

Today we think of nursing and medicine as two distinct professions, but during the Civil War, when we had little understanding of microbes and pathogens and when elite physicians were developing an exclusive professional culture, the distance between the work of nurses and the work of physicians was smaller. Jane E. Schultz, PhD, professor of English at IUPUI, will bring listeners into the world of Civil War medicine by focusing on the work of military relief as it was performed in general and field hospitals by people with varying degrees of preparation and diverse motivations.

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Sunday, June 5, 2011 1-4pm

Partnering with the Purdue Master Gardeners and the Herb Society of Central Indiana, IMHM will host the second annual A Garden Tea party in our Medicinal Plant Garden of the Indiana Medical History Museum.  

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Friday, May 13, 2011 6pm

Sherlock Holmes and the Beginning of Modern Forensic Science 

 

Encore Presentation of the Spring Forensics Lecture


Arthur Conan Doyle's character, Sherlock Holmes, was the first fictional detective to explicitly base his solutions of cases on observation, science, and deductive reasoning.  Many of the stories include accounts of Holmes' detailed examinations of crime scenes and pieces of evidence.  David Zauner, a member of the Indianapolis Sherlock Holmes society, The Illustrious Clients, and a practicing forensic scientist, will explore how the Holmes stories reflect applications of scientific principles to criminal investigations in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and how forensic science has developed since that time to its present state.

 

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Thursday, May 5, 2011

The President is a Sick Man

Talk and Book Signing with author Matthew Algeo

 

Copies of Mr. Algeo's book (to be released in May) will be available for purchase.

 

Matthew Algeo, an award-winning journalist and author of 'Harry Truman's Excellent Adventure' and 'Last Team Standing', will talk about his newest book, scheduled for release in May 2011, The President is a Sick Man: Wherein the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survies a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman who Dared Expose the Truth. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and can be ...signed by the author.

"On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend's yacht and was not heard from for five days. During that time, a team of doctors removed a cancerous tumor from the president's palate along with much of his upper jaw. When an enterprising reporter named E. J. Edwards exposed the secret operation, Cleveland denied it and Edwards was consequently dismissed as a disgrace to journalism. Twenty-four years later, one of the president's doctors finally revealed the incredible truth, but many Americans simply would not believe it. After all, Grover Cleveland's political career was built upon honesty- his most memorable quote was 'Tell the truth'- so it was nearly impossible to believe he was involved in such a brazen cover-up. This is the first full account of the disappearance of Grover Cleveland during that summer more than a century ago."

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 Sunday, May 1, 2011 3pm at the Pike Performing Arts Center

Women and Music in Science


Orcenith Smith, Conducting

 

The Indiana Medical History Museum is a community partner with the Philharmonic Orchestra of Indianapolis for their 70th classical concert season The Arts of Science and Music.  

 

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 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 4 to 5:15pm

Sherlock Holmes and the Beginning of Modern Forensic Science 

 

Spring Forensics Lecture


Arthur Conan Doyle's character, Sherlock Holmes, was the first fictional detective to explicitly base his solutions of cases on observation, science, and deductive reasoning.  Many of the stories include accounts of Holmes' detailed examinations of crime scenes and pieces of evidence.  David Zauner, a member of the Indianapolis Sherlock Holmes society, The Illustrious Clients, and a practicing forensic scientist, will explore how the Holmes stories reflect applications of scientific principles to criminal investigations in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and how forensic science has developed since that time to its present state.

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 Saturday, December  18, 2010 10am to 3pm                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

 12 Days of Indy Christmas

This open house event is free and open to the public.

 

Come visit the nation's oldest surviving pathology laboratory.  Browse the museum and talk with staff and volunteers.

 

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 Friday, November 12, 2010

A Progressive Affair:  The Threat of Unsafe Food in the Early 20th Century

 

This event is part of the Spirit & Place Festival. 

 

A quiz show about food additives, an exhibit of Indiana public health posters (some drawn by Indiana native Gaar Williams), and a discussion by Jeff Bennett of IUPUI’s School of Liberal Arts of two men who were instrumental in establishing the pure food and drugs laws, Dr. John Hurty, Indiana State Health Commissioner (1896-1922), and Dr. Harvey Wiley, Head of the US Bureau of Chemistry (1883-1912.)   Also, Stephen Jay, M.D., professor of Medicine and Public Health at Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Public Health will discuss our nation’s history of food adulteration, his own work to spread awareness on Capitol Hill.

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Sunday, October 24, 2010, 2-4pm

6th Annual Wizards Academy

 

Visit with magical creatures from the Indianapolis Zoo and explore the science behind your favorite wizard’s magical world through hands-on experiments! Parents are invited to attend a special presentation about encouraging early science education, while their young wizards are in class.


Recommended for grades 3-8. Participants are encouraged to dress up in their favorite wizardly attire.


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Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 4-5:15pm

Pathology & Forensic Science:  Then & Now


Fall Forensics Lecture


At this year's Fall installment of the Forensic Science Lecture Series, John E. Pless, M.D., retired Head of Forensic Pathology at Indiana University School of Medicine and current Indiana Medical History Museum Board President, will review the history and development of forensic pathology and discuss the ways advancements in science and technology have changed the field.

 

The Forensic Science Lecture Series (FSLS) was established in 2004 to help educate the public in the forensic sciences and related fields as well as to spotlight the fascinating stories that scientists have to tell. The lecture series is sponsored jointly by the Indiana Medical History Museum and the University of Indianapolis Archaeology & Forensics Laboratory.

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 Tuesday, August 17, 2010 7pm

A Lady Alone

 

A one-woman play by N. Lynn Eckhert MD, Harvard Medical School with Linda Gray Kellet as Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first American woman to receive a medical degree.

 

Presented by the IUSM Office of Faculty Affairs and Professional Development, the IUPUI Office for Women, and the Indiana University School of Medicine Library.


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Friday, August 6, 2010, 7pm

The Art and Life of John Zwara

 

Rachel Berenson Perry, Fine Arts Curator at the Indiana State Museum will talk about the life and artwork of the Austrian-born water color painter John Zwara.  Zwara came to Indianapolis around 1933.  He was a wanderer and spent several years living on the streets of Indianapolis, selling his artwork in order to buy more painting supplies. A friend of Zwara’s, Alexander Vonnegut, recognized that he needed psychiatric help and arranged for his commitment to Central State Hospital in 1938. There he was diagnosed with dementia praecox (schizophrenia). Zwara spent six months at the hospital before his "escape." He died a pauper in 1951.

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Saturdays from June 5 – September 25, 2010, 11am

Walking Tours of the Medicinal Garden

 

The Indiana Medical History Museum is excited to offer new programming this spring and summer. Beginning in June, the museum will offer guided tours of our Medicinal Plant Garden. Each Saturday in June through September, a tour guided by one of our Master Gardeners will be offered at 11am. Tours will include information on plants in the garden, their past and current uses as remedies and their contributions to the growth of pharmaceutical science.


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Wednesday, April 7, 2010, 4-5:15pm

Recovery and Analysis of Rwanda's Mountain Gorillas:  Non-Human Forensic Anthropology

 

This lecture will be given by Amandine Eriksen & Dr. Stephen Nawrocki. 

 

In the summers of 2008 and 2009, University of Indianapolis graduate student Amandine Eriksen and Dr. Stephen Nawrocki traveled to Rwanda, Africa as part of an international team assisting on the Mountain Gorilla Recovery and Preservation Project.  Gorillas that have died during the past 20 years represent a valuable scientific resource for conservationists trying to bring this endangered species back from the brink of extinction.  This presentation details the process of locating and excavating gorilla skeletons using archaeological methods and shows how forensic anthropology techniques developed for use on humans can be applied in very different contexts.

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Saturday, December 19, 2009 10am-3pm
12 Free Days of Indy Christmas Open House                                          

Presented by the Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association

This open house event is free to the public.
Come visit the nation’s oldest surviving pathology laboratory. Browse the museum and talk with our staff and volunteers from 10am to 3pm.

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Sunday, November 22, 2009 4-6pm                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Old World Diseases in the Americas: The Plight of Native Americans and European Conquest presented by Dr. Mark Braun

First Annual Glenn B. Mather, MD Lectureship*                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

When Christopher Columbus made landfall on that fateful day in 1492, he didn't discover a 'New World.'  Rather, he found an old and established world; one with people, societies and culture. What Columbus unknowingly did was create a new world by establishing a link between Europe and the Americas, a connection that proved to have apocalyptic significance for Native Americans. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the important infectious diseases that were so devastating to Native Americans following European and African contact.

Dr. Mark Braun received his undergraduate degree in biology from Purdue University in 1970. He attended Indiana University Medical School, graduating in 1975, and following medical school pursued a residency in pathology. After completing his residency, he joined the medical staff of Bloomington Hospital in Bloomington, Indiana, and began teaching part-time at the Indiana University School of Medicine. In 1994, he returned to school to get a masters degree in anthropology and in 1995 joined the faculty of Indiana University in a full-time capacity. His research interests include the study of Native American health issues, particularly the period of early European contact and the introduction of European infectious diseases into New World populations. He has published articles in the area of medical education as well as the field of diagnosis of human disease, including the identification of fragments of ancient tuberculosis DNA in Native American skeletal remains dating from 1000 AD. He has been recognized repeatedly for his teaching abilities.

*Respected pathologist and Indiana Medical History Museum Board member, Glenn B. Mather, MD, passed away in June of 2009. The Glenn B. Mather, MD Lectureship has been established in his honor.

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Friday, November 13, 2009 7-9:30pm
Temples of the Future: Laboratories of the 19th Century

Movie and Discussion
This Spirit & Place Festival event is free.

The film Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet will be shown in the amphitheater followed by a discussion about the contributions of laboratories, past and present, as well as their role as a supporter, or opponent, of social, political, and religious beliefs. The discussion will be lead by William Schneider PhD, Director of the Medical Humanities-Health Studies program at IUPUI and Richard Gregory, PhD Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the IUPUI School of Medicine.

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Wednesday, October, 14, 2009 4-5:15pm
Fall Forensic Lecture

This lecture is free and open to the public.

Eleanor D. Kinney, JD MPH will reflect on the Muncie smallpox epidemic in 1893 and talk about current public health laws and the governments role in responding to bioterrorism, epidemics, and other health crises.


The Forensic Science Lecture Series (FSLS) was established in 2004 to help educate the public in the forensic sciences and related fields as well as to spotlight the fascinating stories that scientists have to tell. The lecture series is sponsored jointly by the Indiana Medical History Museum and the University of Indianapolis Archaeology & Forensics Laboratory.

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Sunday, October 25, 2009 2-4pm
5th Annual Wizard’s Academy

 Children $6; Adults $4; max $20 per family.  

Visit with magical creatures from the Indianapolis Zoo and explore the science behind your favorite wizard’s magical world through hands-on experiments! Parents are invited to attend a special presentation about encouraging early science education, while their young wizards are in class.
Recommended for grades 3-8. Participants are encouraged to dress up in their favorite wizardly attire.

Allergy Alert: Those allergic to latex products should be aware that latex balloons will be used in one experiment.

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Saturday, July 18, 2009, 4-5:30pm                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

The Pandemic Plus 90: 1919-2009

This lecture is free and open to the public.
The Indiana Medical History Museum is hosting this Marion County Historical Society program. The topic will be the influenza pandemic in Marion County, 1918-1919, and the possible return of a pandemic in 2009.

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Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 6:30-8:30pm
IMHM celebrates the second printing of From Under the Cloud at Seven Steeples by Lucy Jane King, M.D.

This event is free and open to the public.
The IMHM will host a book signing by Dr. Lucy Jane King. At 7pm, Dr. Charles Hazelrigg will present Waiting for Anna: 1848-1900 at the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane, a pictorial early history of the hospital that awaited Anna Agnew’s admission in 1878. At 7:30pm, Dr. King will present Finding Anna: Researching Anna Agnew and her Personal Reminiscences of Insanity.
Dr. King will be available beginning at 6:30pm and after the presentations to sign copies of her book. Copies of the softcover book will be available for $18.00 at the museum.

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Wednesday, March 25, 2009, 4-5:15pm
2009 Spring Forensic Lecture Series

This lecture is free and open to the public.
Raising the Dead: When Our Ancestors are Evicted will be presented by forensic anthropologist Stephen Nawrocki, Ph.D. of the University of Indianapolis. In 2007, the University of Indianapolis assisted in the excavation of 33 burials from the 19th century Wright Cemetery, located at the intersection of I-69 and I-465 on the northeast side of Indianapolis. Impending roadwork necessitated a wholesale removal of the cemetery. The University of Indianapolis Archaeology & Forensics Laboratory conducted a detailed analysis of the skeletons prior to their reburial. This lecture will detail the process and issues involved with a project of this nature.

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Saturday, December 20, 2008, 10am-3pm
IMHM Open House

Admission is free.
The Indiana Medical History Museum will have an “Open House” from 10am until 3pm. Full tours will not be given, but staff and volunteers will be stationed throughout the museum to answer questions. This event is part of the “12 Days of Christmas” sponsored by the Indiana Convention and Visitors Association. 

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Sunday, November 9, 2008, 2pm
Center for Bioethics and Center for Inquiry Panel Discussion

The museum will be partnering with the Center for Bioethics and the Center for Inquiry to host an extraordinary panel discussion or the Spirit & Place Festival. Panelists include Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., Director, Indiana Center for Bioethics; Kimberly Quaid, Ph.D., Professor of Medical and Molecular Genetics; and David Flockhart, M.D., Ph.D., Chief, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, IU School of Medicine. The topic of discussion will be The Ethics of Predictive Genetic Testing and the Search for Personalized Drugs.

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Sunday, October 26, 2008
Fourth Annual Wizards Academy

$6 for children; $4 for adults
Inspired by books about your favorite boy wizard, Wizards Academy is where students will learn science by exploring principles of physics, chemistry, and electricity. Costumed volunteers will conduct demonstrations in the Great Amphitheater. These demonstrations and a special visit from animals mentioned in the books will make this a fun and educational afternoon.

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Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 4pm
Fall Forensic Lecture Series

This lecture is free and open to the public.
Presented by Jay Siegel, Ph.D., the Director of the Forensics & Investigative Sciences Program and the Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at IUPUI, will discuss The Role of Observer Bias in the Analysis of Pattern Evidence.

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Saturday, June 14, 2008
Extra Innings! Festival

Celebrate the Extra Innings! Festival on the grounds of the Indiana Medical History Museum, where some of the movie Eight Men Out was filmed. The day begins with a tour of Indianapolis sites used in the filming, including Bush Stadium. Afterwards you can watch vintage baseball games, hear baseball historians speak about the 1919 Black Sox scandal, then watch the film outdoors at dusk.

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Saturday, May 3, 2008
The Illustrious Clients of Indianapolis Meeting

Sherlock Holmes fans- The Illustrious Clients of Indianapolis, the city’s oldest Sherlock Holmes' society, will meet at the Indiana Medical History Museum, and you are welcome to join them. 

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Wednesday, April 2, 2008, 3pm
Unearthing Belle: Exposing the World’s Most Prolific Female Serial Killer

This lecture is free and open to the public.
In 1908, LaPorte county resident Belle Gunness was found dead in her burned out house, along with the remains of her three children. In the investigation that followed, police discovered the bodies and dismembered remains of multiple victims buried on Belle’s farm. Questions have surrounded the identification of Belle’s body, which lacked a head. Did she fake her death, substituting a female victim for herself? Did she have an accomplice? Fearing the discovery of her crimes, did she skip town and live out her remaining days in California? For the first time, this famous case has been reopened by actual forensic scientists. Andrea Simmons, attorney and forensic anthropology student at the University of Indianapolis, will report some of her findings. She will describe her scrutiny of the historical documents and her 2007 examination and re-analysis of the body presumed to be Belle’s.

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